Tuesday, January 21, 2014

That's a great idea!

More thoughts from your local Marketing genius. I like smaller cups. It takes just as long to make a small cup as a big one. People always seem to opt for the biggest one in the pack. They think they are getting more for their money. I thought well if I'm going to be so stupid as to make small cups I will try to lure them in with different handles. Mostly they hate my handles cause I make cup handles for one finger and at best two. I often hear they want to put their entire fist in the handle. I tell them that is a great idea but I ain't going to do it!


7 comments:

carter gillies said...

I've started a whole industry of marketing small and modest sized pots to kids. Putting real art in the hands of young people is one of the best things I can do to help get them interested in supporting the arts throughout their lives. And the kids love selecting their very own cup or bowl or plate. I give them half off the adult price to make it affordable, so its also cheap enough that if it breaks the parents won't feel like they made a bad decision. And really, the parents all see enthusiastic about making their children a part of the pottery scene. I've heard so many stories about kids refusing to take their meals without their new handmade piece of pottery. I may not get the full price on these pots, but I think my customers have one more reason to keep coming back. Decent marketing and also a service to the community and to the arts themselves.

smartcat said...

You are definitely the Handle Man! (Many awful puns are floating around here, but I will spare you and others.) Seriously those are some great handles...the second one from the right looks like a perfect 'thumb cup'. I often put my thumb through the handle and cradle the bottom of the cup in my hand.

Cyndi said...

Hey, Tony, I love the variety. Actually, I was thinking of doing the same thing - sort of. My 2014 to do list is to make four different styles of mugs. I constantly walk customers around the gallery, putting mugs in their hands, asking "How does this one feel to you?" I love Carter's idea of getting pots into kids hands. The ski industry does a similar thing by offering free tickets to kids under 12, etc. Have a good day. It is freezing here!

Maureen Ross said...

We always felt you should be able to hold a mug with your eyes shut. This is the customer's introduction to you. The customer is looking for comfort and an intangible bonding with the creator, your objective should be to provide them with the very best workmanship you can, to give them that comfort. After the relationship has been established there will be plenty of time to educate and instruct, but you must establish that first connection to encourage the ongoing relationship. The pot has to please both you and the customer, often a tricky balance. If you are trying to achieve an ongoing relationship with the customer, it is important that their introduction to your work is a positive one.
Maureen

RichardA said...

Funny, I just got up from making a boardful of mugs for a dinnerware client. Now, I like to make handles different sizes for sets, because some people are two fingered, some three fingered, some full fisted drinkers. Now, my mugs are always two fingered, most three fingered...the client wanted me to downsize the mugs but up size the handles...tune in tomorrow to see how it turns out.

RichardA said...

Funny, I just got up from making a boardful of mugs for a dinnerware client. Now, I like to make handles different sizes for sets, because some people are two fingered, some three fingered, some full fisted drinkers. Now, my mugs are always two fingered, most three fingered...the client wanted me to downsize the mugs but up size the handles...tune in tomorrow to see how it turns out.

Dan Finnegan said...

Crap! I've been making mugs all week and now I'm afraid to handle them 'cause they'll be so boring next to these! I fell into the trap of making ever bigger mugs, but started making wee ones and find lots of buyers. But you're right, same amount of work...$5.00 difference! Go figure. and then if you make REAL tiny pots, they are worth more!